Archive for the 78’s on Screen Category

Earl Hines And His Orchestra-Sweet Ella May, 1929

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's, Recording Artists of the 1930's and 1940's, The Sound of Jazz and Hot Dance 78's with tags , , on March 29, 2015 by the78rpmrecordspins

Back in the early 1970’s I fondly remember taking my father to the now defunct Chicken Deli in Toronto one evening to see the great Earl “Fatha” Hines play piano. Since then, I have long admired his styling, as he was known for his great technique and talent for improvisation, horn-like phrasing, and a rhythm which influenced popular jazz throughout the swing era and into bebop. One of my favorite Hines recordings is “Sweet Ella May” recorded on Victor in 1929, and we hear Hines providing the vocals and solos on the piano.

 

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Mart Britt And His Orchestra-Goose Creek, 1928

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's, The Sound of Jazz and Hot Dance 78's with tags , , , on March 28, 2015 by the78rpmrecordspins

Here is a great little territory band that recorded sides with Victor. The personnel include Tony Almerico or Irwin Kunz-c/? Blue Steele-tb/Sidney Arodin-cl/Terry Shand-p/Mart Britt-bj/? sb/? d. Memphis, September 14, 1928. Vic 21760.

Our One Year Anniversary Special! The Chicago Rhythm Kings “There’ll Be Some Changes Made” 1928

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's, The Sound of Jazz and Hot Dance 78's with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2014 by the78rpmrecordspins

Recorded in Chicago, April 4th 1928

Personnel: Muggsy Spanier-cornet / Frank Teschmachmer-clarinet / Mezz Mezzrow-tenor sax / Joe Sulivan-piano / Eddie Condon-banjo / Jim Lannigan-brass bass / Gene Krupa-drums / Red McKenzie-vocal.

Our 700th Post Special! Blue Bubbles By Duke Ellington And His Orchestra 1927

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , , , on January 26, 2014 by the78rpmrecordspins

“Blue Bubbles” was originally recorded on December 19th, 1927 on Victor 22985, and features the wonderful trumpet master, Bubber Miley. 

 

You Ain’t Too Old – Clarence Williams Jug Band

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , , , on October 25, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

A Red Hot Jazz song recorded Aug. 7, 1933 on Columbia Royal Blue Wax featuring Clarence Williams & His Jug Band. The members of this fantastic scat group are:
Ed Allen – Cornet
Herman Chittison – Piano
Charlie Irvis ? – Trombone
Lonnie Johnson – Guitar
Jimmie McLin – Guitar
Albert Nicholas – Clarinet
Ikey Robinson – Banjo
Cecil Scott Clarinet
Omer Simeon ? – Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone
Willie “The Lion” Smith – Piano
Eva Taylor – Vocals
Clarence Todd – Kazoo, Vocals
Clarence Williams – Piano ?, Jug, Vocals
Willie Williams – Washboard
I could only find 9 different songs that they recorded under this name. They were on three labels, Columbia, Okeh, and Vocalion. Clarence Williams had many bands like others of the day, and a lot of solo work. Some of his other projects were Clarence Williams and his Band ,Clarence Williams’ Blue Five, Clarence Williams’ Blue Seven, Clarence Williams’ Jazz Kings,Clarence Williams’ Novelty Band,Clarence Williams’ Novelty Four, Clarence Williams Trio, Clarence Williams and His Orchestra,
Clarence Williams’ Stompers, Clarence Williams’ Washboard Band, Clarence Williams’ Washboard Five, Clarence Williams’ Washboard Four, Blue Grass Foot Warmers, Dixie Washboard Band, Jamaica Jazzers, Red Onion Jazz Babies, Barrel House Five Orchestra, Clarence Williams’ Jug Band
Clarence Williams and his Bottomland Orchestra, Memphis Jazzers, Seven Gallon Jug Band. Enjoy!

T.N.T. by Fletcher Henderson and His Orchestra 1925

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , , , , , , on October 17, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

The orchestration of T.N.T. on Columbia 509 D, makes it one of my favorite Fletcher Henderson recordings. Just look at the lineup in the session, and you will see why:

Coleman Hawkins (cl,ts,bass sax ); Louis Armstrong (ct); Elmer Chambers, Joe Smith (tp);
Charley Green (tb); Buster Bailey (ts) Don Redman (as,ts,arr); Fletcher Henderson (lead + p);
Charlie Dixon (bj); Ralph Escuderos (tu); Kaiser Marshall (dm)
New York City, October 21 1925

Golden Gate Orchestra-Static Strut 1926

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , , on October 12, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

 

 

Of  all the versions of “Static Strut” that were recorded, this one by the California Ramblers stands out as my favorite.

Edison record 51746-L

Recorded in New York City on April 23, 1926

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Nichols – Feelin’ No Pain (1927)

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's, Recording Artists Who Appeared in Film with tags , , , , , , , on September 27, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Feelin’ No Pain
(Fud Livingston)
Performed by Red Nichols and His Five Pennies
August 15, 1927
Brunswick 3623

Red Nichols, Leo McConville, Mannie Klein (trumpet)/ Miff Mole (trombone)/ Pee Wee Russell (clarinet)/ Fud Livingston (tenor sax)/ Adrian Rollini (bass sax, goofus)/ Lennie Hayton (piano)/ Dick McDonough (guitar)/ Vic Berton (drums)

Red Nichols and Miff Mole became a fixture in New York’s jazz scene, recording frequently with a regular band that included Jimmy Dorsey, Artie Schutt and Vic Berton. On Brunswick, the band was christened Red Nichols and his Five Pennies, a name that stuck with Nichols throughout his recording career regardless of the actual number of musicians in the band. On Columbia the band was given a standard house band pseudonym The Charleston Chasers. On Columbia’s budget Harmony label the band was The Arkansas Travellers. On the Perfect label they were The Red Heads. On the OKeh label they were Miff Mole and his Little Molers. When they recorded for Edison or Victor they were Red and Miff’s Stompers.

Irving Mills and his Hotsy Totsy Gang – My Lit’l Honey And Me (Brunswick 4674 1929)

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's, The Sound of Jazz and Hot Dance 78's with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 14, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

 

Irving Mills (Jan.16,1894 – April 21,1985) was a jazz music publisher, also known by the name of “Joe Primrose.”

Mills was born to Jewish parents in the Lower East Side of Manhattan in New York City. He founded Mills Music with his brother Jack in 1919. Between 1919 and 1965, when they sold Mills Music, Inc., they built and became the largest independent music publisher in the world. He died in 1985 in Palm Springs, California.

Irving and Jack discovered a number of great songwriters, among them Sammy Fain, Harry Barris, Gene Austin, Hoagy Carmichael, Jimmy McHugh, and Dorothy Fields. He either discovered or greatly advanced the careers of Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, Ben Pollack, Jack Teagarden, Benny Goodman, Will Hudson, Raymond Scott and many others.

Although not a musician himself (he did sing, however), Irving decided to put together his own studio recording group. In Irving Mills and his Hotsy Totsy Gang he had for sidemen: Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Joe Venuti, Eddie Lang, Arnold Brillhardt, Arthur Schutt, and Manny Klein. Other variations of his bands featured Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, and Red Nichols (Irving gave Red Nichols the tag “and his Five Pennies.”)

One of his innovations was the “band within a band,” recording small groups (he started this in 1928 by arranging for members of Ben Pollack’s band to record hot small group sides for the various dime store labels, out of the main orchestra and printing “small orchestrations” transcribed off the record, so that non-professional musicians could see how great solos were constructed. This was later done by Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, and many other bands.

In late 1936, with involvement by Herbert Yates of the American Record Corporation, Irving started the Master and Variety labels, which for their short life span were distributed by ARC through their Brunswick and Vocalion label sales staff. From December, 1936, through about September, 1937, an amazing amount of records were issued on these labels. Master’s best selling artists were Duke Ellington, Raymond Scott, as well as Hudson-De Lange Orchestra, Casper Reardon and Adrian Rollini. Variety’s roster included Cab Calloway, Red Nichols, the small groups from Ellington’s band led by Barney Bigard, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart, and Johnny Hodges, as well as Noble Sissle, Frankie Newton, The Three Peppers, Chu Berry, Billy Kyle, and other major and minor jazz and pop performers around New York. In such a short time, an amazing amount of fine music was recorded for these labels.

By late 1937 a number of problems caused the collapse of these labels. The Brunswick and Vocalion sales staff had problems of their own, with competition from Victor and Decca, and it wasn’t easy to get this new venture off the ground. Mills tried to arrange for distribution overseas to get his music issued in Europe, but was unsuccessful. Also, it’s quite likely that these records simply weren’t selling as well as hoped for.

After the collapse of the labels, those titles that were still selling on Master were reissued on Brunswick and those still selling on Variety were reissued on Vocalion. Mills continued his M-100 recording series after the labels were taken over by ARC, and after cutting back recording to just the better selling artists, new recordings made from about January 1938 by Master were issued on Brunswick (later Columbia) and Vocalion (later the revived Okeh) until May 7, 1940.

Irving was recording all the time and became the head of the American Recording Company, which is now Columbia Records. Once radio blossomed Irving was singing at six radio stations seven days a week plugging Mills tunes. Jimmy McHugh, Sammy Fain, and Gene Austin took turns being his pianist.

He produced one picture, Stormy Weather, for Twentieth Century Fox in 1943, which starred jazz greats Lena Horne, Cab Calloway, Zutty Singleton, and Fats Waller and the legendary dancers the Nicholas Brothers and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson. He had a contract to do other movies but found it “too slow” so he continued finding, recording and plugging music.

Much has been made about Mills’ co-writing credit on a number of key Ellington compositions. The fact remains that those acts managed by Irving Mills got the best gigs and had the greatest opportunities in the recording studio.

Irving lived to be over 91 years old. His place in the history of jazz is founded primarily on his business skills rather than his singing and songwriting abilities, but it was his management skills and publishing empire that were central to the history and financial success of jazz. Because of his promotion of black entertainers a leading black newspaper referred to him as the Abraham Lincoln of music.

Irving Mills and his Hotsy Totsy Gang – My Lit’l Honey And Me (1929)

The Chicago Rhythm Kings-I’ve Found A New Baby 1928

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , , , , , , on September 1, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

“The Chicago Rhythm Kings”:
Muggsy Spanier, c / Frank Teschemacher, cl / Mezz Mezzrow, ts / Joe Sullivan, p / Eddie Condon bj, v / Jim Lannigan, bb / Gene Krupa, d / Red McKenzie, v.
Chicago, March 27, 1928.

Junie Cobb and his Grains of Corn-Shake That Jelly Roll-1929

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , on August 25, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Shake That Jelly Roll
written by Junie Cobb and Lester Melrose
performed by Junie C. Cobb & his Grains Of Corn
recorded in Chicago, 9 February 1929
issued as Vocalion 1263 circa March 1929

Born in Hot Springs, Arkansas, Junius C. “Junie” Cobb was competent on tenor saxophone, clarinet, banjo, piano, violin, and drums. He played with Johnny Dunn as a teenager, and after moving to Chicago he led his own ensemble in 1920-21 at the Club Alvadere. In the 1920s he played with King Oliver (1924-27) on banjo and with Jimmie Noone (1928-29). Following this Cobb put together another band of his own, and recorded with this ensemble for Vocalion and Victor. He played in Paris briefly in the early 1930s, then returned to lead groups in Chicago.

Jimmy Cobb – cornet
Junie Cobb, Cecil Erwin and/or Darnell Howard – reeds
Bob Waugh – violin
Alex Hill – piano
Eustern Woodfork – banjo
probably Bill Johnson – bass
Jimmy Bertrand or Harry Dial – drums

Lucky Lindy-Sam Lanin and his Orchestra-1927

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , , , , , on August 24, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

I found this record last year on Canadian Domino and was amazed by the fact Rust does not list this record in his Jazz Discography (I have the first edition). The solo by Red Nichols and the plane effects, make this an enjoyable addition to anyone’s collection.

BERT FIRMAN & HIS BAND (1927): Slippery Elm

Posted in 78's on Screen, Recording Artist's of the 1920's and 1930's with tags , , on March 22, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

As the Devonshire Restaurant Dance Band

Joe Bussard-King of 78’s

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags , , on March 15, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

A video about Joe Bussard talking about his record collection.

Louisiana Rhythm Kings (Guy Lombardo’s Orchestra) – Nobody’s Sweetheart (1928)

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags , on March 4, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Proof that the famous band leader could play Jazz.

How A Columbia Record Is Made-1928

Posted in 78 RPM Record Development, 78's on Screen with tags , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Part Two of the silent film is shown here as it details the manufacturing process Columbia used at its plant.

Jimmie Noone’s Apex Club Orchestra – Every Evening

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags , , on March 1, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Vocalion 1185.
Rec.: May 1928.
Jimmy Noone(clarinet).
Joe Poston (alto sax).
Earl Hines (piano).
Buddy Scott (banjo).
Johnny Wells (drums

The Broadway Bellhops – There’s a Cradle In Caroline. Harmony 504-H

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 1, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Sam Lanin dir. Bix Beiderbecke-c/Hymie Farberman-t/Bill Rank-tb/Don Murray-cl/Frank Trumbauer-Cm/Bobby Davis-as/Joe Venuti-vn/Frank Signorelli-p/John Cali-bj/Joe Tarto-bb/Vic Berton-d/irving Kaufman-v.
New York, September 29, 1927

The Little Ramblers – Look Who’s Here, 1925

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags on March 1, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Young Thomas Edison Invents The Phonograph Using Lego!

Posted in 78's on Screen, Records in Canada with tags , , on February 24, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Found this humorous video, and had to share it with you!

Joe Candullo and his Everglades Orchestra-Hard To Get Gertie-1926

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags , , on February 23, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Canadian Domino 21193 as “The Collegians”-1926

”Kansas City Kitty” The City Stompers – Irving Kaufman 1928

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags , , on February 21, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Radiex (Grey Gull) Record # 1721

This video is intended to supplement the earlier article on Grey Gull Records, as an example

How 78 RPM Records Are Made-Part 1

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags on February 16, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

How 78 RPM Records Are Made-Part 2

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags on February 16, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Cutting a 78 RPM Record

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags on February 12, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

Using a portable Rek-O-Kut record cutting machine/lathe to make a 78.

Canadian Electric Test Pressing-Compo Company

Posted in 78's on Screen with tags on February 11, 2013 by the78rpmrecordspins

78 RPM test pressing

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